Texas School Book Depository in Dallas

After working with the Staubach Company in Dallas for several years, and making dozens and dozens of visits to the city…I had still not visited the site of John F. Kennedy’s assassination at Dealey Plaza. On my recent trip, of February 21, 2011 I decided to check it out since I was staying downtown a few blocks away. The 7 Story Museum at Dealey Plaza is located on the historic site where Dallas was founded. It is located on the 6th floor of an early 1901 warehouse known in 1963 as the infamous Texas School Book Depository.

This was Sherman Hopkins, a local tour guide who gave us our unofficial tour and debunked the legend of the lone shooter. He took us all over the site and gave my attorney Colin Campbell and me  the non-official view of the assassination. He told us most people believe and that the evidence supports the theory that there were four shooters. I looked out the window…and studied the shots that sniper would have had to make. I think it would have been a very difficult two shots indeed. I must admit Colin and I were impressed by his review. The Warren commission files will not be opened until 2039. That is a long time to wait to find out.

Dealey Plaza was built in the 1930′s as a vehicular gateway to downtown. A well known feature of the plaza was the grassy knoll, which rises from the north side of Elm Street. The plaza was built by the civilian conservation corps during the Roosevelt years. No one knew the tragic role it would play in American history.

This is the view that looks south. If you look in the middle of the street..you can see the X in the center lane that shows where the limousine was when the president was hit the first time.

This is the spot where the famous Zapruder film was taken on 8 millimeter film. He was filming from this post at the end of the hedge.

This is Elm street …if you again look at the middle lane you will see the first X and then the Second is barely visible where the second shot killed the president. The motorcade was so close to being out of danger. Another 30 yards and it would have been on the freeway and safely headed back to airport.

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